Christians Call On New Prime Minister to Prioritise Peace

As Boris Johnson becomes Prime Minister today members of the Network of Christian Peace Organisations has written an open letter calling for the new government to work to ensure a peaceful resolution to the current tensions with Iran as well as seeking security throughout the United Kingdom as Brexit discussions continue. The letter was coordinated by the Fellowship of Reconciliation and calls on the Prime Minister to “prioritise the work of authentic peace”.

As Iran continues to hold a British oil tanker in the gulf and tensions between the United States and Iran continue to escalate, there is an increasing chance that Britain could be drawn in to further conflict in the Middle East with disastrous consequences.

John Cooper, Director of the Fellowship of Reconciliation said: “As the new Prime Minister takes office this afternoon we pray for the wisdom, strength, and courage to seek peaceful solutions to the problems our country faces. We believe there is a different way of conducting international relations, focussing on bringing people together and dialogue rather than conflict and division. We encourage the Prime Minister to provide this leadership.”

Annual Council 2019

Our keynote speaker holds the council captivated (Photo Dave Pybus/Fellowship of Reconciliation)

Members of the Fellowship met at Hinde Street Methodist Church on Saturday 13th July for the 2019 Annual Council. Through a varied agenda, mixing conversation, worship and challenge, they explored the activities of the Fellowship and thought about where the work could go next.

The work of the Fellowship was shared via verbal reports. This included news from Scotland, the International Peacemakers Fund, campaign activity and an update on previous and future fundraising plans. Members and supporters asked probing questions and new ideas began to emerge.

The work of the Fellowship was challenged by a wide ranging and deeply personal address from Revd Dr Jongikaya Zihle (pictured above). Mixing together his own personal story with reflections on historical and current sources of division, he opened up topics of conversation including Brexit, racism, and diversity. In the final moments of the talk, we collectively traveled to South Africa as a very personal story was shared of Jongi meeting his Jailer. This occurred as part of the Truth and Reconciliation process and he explained the build-up and impact of the meeting on him and the person he was meeting. The way he told his story weaved together theology and emotion and left the room deeply moved.

The work of the Fellowship was strengthened by the appointment of Trustees. We went into the meeting with 5 Trustees and left with 10 Trustees. This significant increase in interest in a great vote of confidence, as well as challenge, and the staff look forward to an uplifting year ahead as we work together for peace.

The date for Annual Council 2020 will be set soon so watch this space!

FoR Welcomes Government Defeat at Court of Appeal

Christian peace charity The Fellowship of Reconciliation has welcomed today’s court of appeal ruling that the UK government should not have granted licences enabling arms sales to Saudi Arabia.  The case was brought by Campaign Against the Arms Trade and focussed on evidence that the weapons sold by the UK have been used by Saudi Arabia in Yemen.

John Cooper, Director of the Fellowship, said:

“We welcome today’s judgement as a vital step in building peace and ensuring that the UK doesn’t profit from the humanitarian catastrophe happening in Yemen. It should provide a wake-up call to the government that putting profit before peace isn’t a viable principle for a trade policy”

He continued:

“The victory today is marred by the knowledge that thousands of civilians have died in Yemen in the time that this court case has been fought. We lament each life lost and urge the government to use today as a moment to re-focus its energy into supporting a peaceful solution to the conflict in Yemen”

FoR called to Prayer and Protest in response to Donald Trump

Yesterday FoR marched with thousands of other activists, students, retirees and changemakers to protest about President Donald Trump’s state visit to the UK. The atmosphere was lively with mass produced and handmade placards sharing a desire for hope and change. The Fellowship of Reconciliation (FoR) marched with the Quaker Social Witness (QSW) and pacifist and author Tim Gee.

Our call wasn’t just to the streets of London. Supporters around the country joined with other religious leaders in vigils and their own local protests.

It is important for us as a Fellowship of Reconciliation to continue to spread messages of togetherness and unity in the name of Jesus. As we walked in solidarity yesterday, we held banners celebrating the goodness of God.

We felt it was important to be out on the streets because ultimately, we believe that ‘In a world broken by violence and conflict we are called to be peacemakers’

In peace and solidarity,FoR

New Director for FoR

The Fellowship of Reconciliation (FoR), has appointed John Cooper to the new role of Director from 1st May 2019.  In this post, John will provide leadership for the Fellowship in its future campaigning, education work and engagement with churches.

Richard Bickle, Chair of Trustees said:

“We are delighted that John has accepted our offer to take up this new position.  We believe that his experience of church engagement and fundraising, together with a personal commitment to Christian peace-making will enable us to increase the reach and impact of our work.“

The work of the Fellowship consists of projects that deliver education about Christian peace-making, creation and delivery of training in ways to respond to violence, campaigning against the causes of conflict and creating links with other branches of the Fellowship around the world.

John Cooper said:

“FoR is a challenging and inspiring movement to be part of. I look forward to taking up this role and helping the Fellowship bring alive the promise of peace and the power of non-violence.”

John started work for the Fellowship in November 2018 as Development Manager and in that time has laid the groundwork for a podcast, begun to explore questions of diversity in the peace movement, written a strategy for the Fellowship’s campaigning and advocacy work and spent time talking and listening with other groups in the peace movement.

John previously worked for FoR as a fundraiser for their International Peacemaker Fund. His varied church-based career has also included working for Christian Aid, the Joint Public Issues Team and All We Can (then Methodist Relief and Development Fund). He has a commitment to an active church that engages on issues in the public square. He is training to be a local preacher in the Methodist Church and a member of The Cotteridge Church, in South Birmingham.

Gospel nonviolence in action: Conclusion

Corrymeela Sunset. Image by Nick, Creative Commons licence CC BY

Corrymeela Sunset. Image by Nick, Creative Commons licence CC BY

What does Gospel nonviolence look like in action? The Fellowship of Reconciliation held a joint conference with the Anglican Pacifist Fellowship looking at this, and included a talk from the Revd David Mumford. Over a series of 14 blogs, some short and some longer, he outlines the different themes and topics covered in his presentation. 

Christian nonviolence is rooted in a commitment to following Jesus, whether that ‘works’ or not. For some Christians that leads to quietism in which their task is to be faithful whilst awaiting the gift of the coming Kingdom. Such a stance may involve refusal to obey unjust state demands, such as conscription.

Nonetheless, a reflection on ways in which love and nonviolence can be expressed in action will assist pacifists in countering any assertion that to be a pacifist is to be passive in the face of injustice. The renunciation of war and violent methods of settling conflicts can open the way to creatively discover other approaches to conflict resolution which in many ways will deepen people’s spirituality and enable them to walk more closely with God.

Gospel nonviolence in action: Gender and conflict

Muriel Lester, early member of FoR

Muriel Lester, early member of FoR

What does Gospel nonviolence look like in action? The Fellowship of Reconciliation held a joint conference with the Anglican Pacifist Fellowship looking at this, and included a talk from the Revd David Mumford. Over a series of 14 blogs, some short and some longer, he outlines the different themes and topics covered in his presentation. 

Gender is a major element in war. The majority of violent conflicts in the world today are civil conflicts. Rather than members of the armed forces being most at risk, it is civilians and non-combatants who bear the brunt of the suffering.  And amongst civilians it is women, children and the elderly who suffer disproportionately.

Violence is often gendered. In the first, broadly nonviolent, intifada in Palestine that began in 1987, actions were shared, but when violence became the norm it was predominantly males who were involved and the female role was that of supportive nurturers. War is predominantly a male construct.

And in civil society it is usually women (and children) who are the recipients of domestic violence.

Yet women have often take the lead in calling for an end to violence, from Lysistrata in Aristophanes’ play (where women refuse men conjugal rights until the Peloponnesian war is ended) to the Peace People in Northern Ireland. Artificial barriers between family and state, personal and political, domestic and international are broken down.

The International Fellowship of Reconciliation, through its Women Peacemakers Programme (WPP), brought together women from different sides of conflict – from Cyprus, from the Caucasus, from Israel/Palestine among others. And through their training of trainers programme the WPP trained many women in nonviolence with the only challenge to them being to go and find other women in their own countries to train.

Gospel nonviolence in action: Religion as divider and uniter

Image by CC BY Christian Senger, Creative Commons licence CC BY

Image by CC BY Christian Senger, Creative Commons licence CC BY

What does Gospel nonviolence look like in action? The Fellowship of Reconciliation held a joint conference with the Anglican Pacifist Fellowship looking at this, and included a talk from the Revd David Mumford. Over a series of 14 blogs, some short and some longer, he outlines the different themes and topics covered in his presentation. 

Religion is often seen as a divisive factor. Certainly, where religion is strongly bound up with tribal identity (as in Northern Ireland, Greece, increasingly in Russia, in the conflicts in the break up of former Yugoslavia and in the Middle East) it is difficult to disentangle the different threads. Yet all work which shows what in each faith tradition makes for nonviolence (or, indeed, places limits on the use of violence) helps to erode religious support for violence. Christian teachings on nonviolence and peace help to undermine Christian support for armed conflict; work in Islam that shows how weapons of mass destruction are incompatible with Koranic teaching or how restricted is the Koranic approval is for violence in the context of Jihad helps to reclaim faith-based nonviolence.

Rise in churches selling white poppies as resources published for Remembrance services

To buy a White Poppies for Churches pack, go to at whitepoppy.org.uk. The pack is published jointly by the PPU and FoR and retails at £60. It contains 100 white poppies, a display box, a poster, leaflets about white poppies and copies of materials for a peace-focused remembrance service, including prayers, sermon ideas, quotes and suggested Bible readings and hymns.

PRESS RELEASE: The organisation that produces white poppies has reported a rise in the number of churches enquiring about making white poppies available for the first time.

The Peace Pledge Union – which includes both religious and non-religious members – drew attention to the increase as they jointly launched a White Poppies for Churches pack with the Fellowship of Reconciliation, a Christian pacifist charity.

Many churches are providing both white and red poppies so that members of their congregations can make their own choice. The launch of the White Poppies for Churches pack follows the successful introduction of a White Poppies for Schools pack last year.

As well as white poppies and display materials, the new pack for churches includes prayers and suggested readings and hymns for Remembrance services that focus on remembering all victims of war and working for peace.

The increase in orders from churches reflects a wider increase in white poppy orders generally. Four weeks before Remembrance Sunday, the number of white poppy orders was twice as high as at the same time last year.

White poppies represent remembrance for all victims of war of all nationalities, a commitment to peace and a rejection of attempts to glamorise or sanitise war.

In contrast, the British Legion, who produce red poppies, argue that remembrance should be concerned only with British and allied armed forces personnel.

There has also been hostility and misunderstanding in some quarters. The rector of St Oswald’s, an Anglican church in Malpas, Cheshire, has refused to allow some older members of his congregation to hang a remembrance banner in the church because it features white poppies.

Oliver Robertson of the Fellowship of Reconciliation said:

“Christianity is a religion of peace and equality. Jesus told his followers to put away the sword and broke many of society’s taboos in his efforts to show that everyone has value in the eyes of God. A Remembrance service that limits who should be mourned is not, we believe, being faithful to that message, which is why we wanted to provide an alternative for those churches that feel the same way.”

Symon Hill of the Peace Pledge Union said:

“The way we remember the past affects the way we approach the present. We will never move on from war if we insist on remembering only those of our own nationality and only those who belonged to armed forces. Compassion cannot stop at national borders. With 90% of victims of war being civilians, I am pleased that more churches are recognising the need to remember all victims of war to commit themselves to working for peace.”

Gospel nonviolence in action: Case study from Israel/Palestine

Zougbhi Zougbhi, Director of Wi'am Palestinian Conflict Resolution Center in Bethlehem. Image FoR

Zougbhi Zougbhi, Director of Wi’am Palestinian Conflict Resolution Center in Bethlehem. Image FoR

What does Gospel nonviolence look like in action? The Fellowship of Reconciliation held a joint conference with the Anglican Pacifist Fellowship looking at this, and included a talk from the Revd David Mumford. Over a series of 14 blogs, some short and some longer, he outlines the different themes and topics covered in his presentation. 

The presence of observers can help to reduce the level of violence, especially if the international background of the accompaniers makes it more likely that the local state will find it difficult to cover up. Bodies such as the Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Palestine and Israel (EAPPI) or Christian Peacemaker Teams send volunteers to live and work alongside communities and campaigners at risk of violence or intimidation.

EAPPI was created in 2002 by the World Council of Churches, following a letter and appeal from local church leaders in Israel and Palestine to create an international presence in the country. Between 25-30 Ecumenical Accompaniers serve at any given time, spending three months accompanying, offering protective presence, and bearing witness. There are now almost 1800 hundred former Ecumenical Accompaniers, many of whom keep involved and interested in working towards a just peace in Palestine and Israel.

This last point is important for the winning of specific issue campaigns. There is a profound value in speaking truth to power and to wider society. People can change and nonviolence through always respecting the humanity and that of the divine within each person makes it much easier for reconciliation to take place.